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How can you be a centenarian? Top 3 Centenarians in the world and their hacks.

Aiming to be a centenarian? Then this article is for you!

Statistics show that owing to the current scientific developments and medical breakthroughs, more individuals throughout the world are accomplishing that aim.
No, living to 100 does not imply being sick and disabled, or confused either. If one chose to, one could stay in relatively decent physical and mental form for a century or more.

According to some experts, the body may live to be 120 years old. And, as Okinawans in Japan, Ikarians in Greece, and Sardinians in Italy have demonstrated, it frequently comes down to lives and habits. Members of these tribes live to be 90 or 100 years old on average, and their civilizations have become examples for the rest of the globe.

Our genes determine 25% of how long we will live. The remaining 75% is determined by our behaviours and lifestyles.

A healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables, along with regular exercise, has been demonstrated over and again to delay the ageing process.

Sedentism and bad behaviours (smoking, drinking, stress, and lack of sleep, for example) on the other hand, harm your body.

Going from 0 to 100 may appear to be a goal reserved for a select few, but studies estimate that the number of people becoming centenarians will keep increasing.

In fact, it is predicted that the world's centenarian population will more than double by 2050!

Looking into the life of centenarians is an interesting subject. How does one reach the triple digits? What are centenarians' lives, diets, and health practices?

We've compiled a list of tips and practices from people who have lived to be 100 years old in order to discover the secrets of living a long life.

1. Lucia DeClerck, the oldest patient of a nursing facility in New Jersey, survived the coronavirus after testing positive on her 105th birthday.

Her recommendations for having a long and healthy life are to pray, avoid junk food, and consume nine gin-soaked raisins.

Lucia DeClerck has survived the Spanish flu, two World Wars, and now a COVID diagnosis — and at 105, she's still here to share her secrets to living a long life.

2. Sister André, the world's second-oldest person, has turned 117 after overcoming a COVID diagnosis in early February. And she celebrated her long life (and recent health crisis) with a dinner that featured foie gras and baked Alaska, as well as a few glasses of wine.

Drinking red wine is one of her longevity secrets, along with a glass of Champagne with dessert.

3. Arlena Labon, 108, of East Cleveland, Ohio, claimed in 2016 that the secret to longevity is to "love one another" and "treat one another well." (She had a relative who lived to be 114, so that may be a family motto.)

In conclusion, science indicates that if you eat well, exercise frequently, and avoid harmful circumstances, you should be able to survive the majority of your friends and potentially even reach your triple digits.

However, many centenarians throughout the world believe that living a long and healthy life has more to do with a general view of life and less to do with physical health.

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