Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty

Continue Shopping

Shielding your DNA

Every living thing has DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) which serves as a biological instruction manual and holds all the data necessary for your body's growth, reproduction, and survival.

Good genes don't just happen by accident.

Shocking right?! Not really. Not all DNA is inevitable, despite the possibility that you may always have brown eyes and your mother's slim build.

For example, we can see how our meals may affect our genetic codes thanks to epigenetics, the study of how environmental variables change DNA by activating and inactivating genes.

However, radiation, air pollution, cigarette smoke, poisonous dietary ingredients, and even byproducts of the body's regular metabolic activities constantly target this important tiny molecule leading to its breakdown.

But fortunately, your DNA can be preserved.

Much of this damage may be repaired by cells, especially while we are younger through DNA repair enzymes, but these enzymes lose their activity with time as they are dependent on NAD+.

As we age, however, DNA damage accumulates and cells become less skilled at doing the required repairs. As a result, there is an accumulation of damaged DNA, which speeds up ageing and raises the chance of developing cancer and other disorders.

1. Consume enormous salads

The appropriate nutrients are necessary for the body to produce DNA, and of all diets, antioxidant-rich vegetables are the best for protecting and mending DNA.

The simplest way to increase vegetable consumption is to eat a daily (giant) salad; it should contain the highest concentrations of nutrients that protect DNA, such as B vitamins (found in lentils, beans, and seeds), carotenoids (found in carrots, sweet potatoes, and leafy greens), anthocyanins (found in red cabbage, red onions, and blueberries), and sulforaphane (cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale).

For example, Steamed broccoli protects your DNA from strand breaks; watercress reduces DNA damage even in smokers, while spinach and tomato diminish oxidative damage.

2. Avoid sacrificing sleep

To maintain healthy DNA, your brain needs lots of sleep.

Lack of sleep may increase DNA breakage and DNA damage, which may explain why those who lack sleep have a higher chance of developing cancer and neurological problems.

The activity of hundreds of genes can be changed by even one week of inadequate sleep.

Make sleep a priority by going to bed at the same time every night, turning off technology (blue light can disrupt sleep), and forgoing evening coffee and big meals.

3. Reconsider drinking coffee

There are some benefits to coffee; some studies indicate that consuming this dark roast might protect DNA. However, coffee can obstruct DNA repair, making it more susceptible.

4. Increase NAD+ levels:

NAD+ is the key molecule for DNA repair enzymes, as it acts like a building material for the DNA repair enzymes to rebuild broken DNA. You can increase NAD+ levels by taking NAD+ boosters like NMN.

Consider switching to green tea instead of coffee. Why? Because it's high in EGCG, an antioxidant that raises levels of proteins that protect your DNA and kill harmful cells.

Even among heavy smokers, drinking four cups of green tea daily reduced DNA damage.

Or you could simply try a combination drink of several types of mushrooms; reishi and chaga to preserve DNA and encourage repair.

In conclusion, the two main repair routes are the same for cells to choose from when it comes to fixing DNA breaks. The option is significant since making the wrong choice might result in more DNA damage. So we might as well help our body in repairing them by making a few lifestyle changes.

Comments (0)

Leave a comment